Fair Registration Practices Report

Dental Surgeons (2017)

The answers seen below were submitted to the OFC by the regulated professions.

This Fair Registration Practices Report was produced as required by:

  • the Fair Access to Regulated Professions and Compulsory Trades Act (FARPACTA) s. 20 and 23(1), for regulated professions named in Schedule 1 of FARPACTA
  • the Health Professions Procedural Code set out in Schedule 2 of the Regulated Health Professions Act (RHPA) s. 22.7 (1) and 22.9(1), for health colleges.

Index

  1. Qualitative Information
  2. Quantitative Information
  3. Submission

1. Qualitative Information

a) Requirements for registration, including acceptable alternatives
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

b) Assessment of qualifications
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

c) Provision of timely decisions, responses, and reasons
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

d) Fees
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

e) Timelines
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

The Registration Department goal for 2017, was to improve turn-around times for new applicants applying for registration. With this in mind, we looked at how resources in the department were currently being utilized and how we could reallocate these resources to processing new applications for registration. To that end, the annual renewal policy for membership registration was revisited this year in our continued efforts to move the entire renewal process on-line through the member resource portal. While the deadline for annual dues did not change, the on-line renewal process opened one month earlier and the suspension date for non-payment of annual fees closed one month earlier. Communication strategy for the annual renewal process was changed by sending emails on specific dates with more direct language which clearly set out the fees, due dates, late fees and the date of suspension for non-payment. This same information was also included on the College's website.

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The changes made to the annual renewal process for existing members had the net effect of improving turn-around time to new applicants applying for membership registration. Our standards processing time of three to five weeks was reduced to a standard processing time of one to three weeks (depending on the number of new applications received in a given week).

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

Improved processing times promotes our commitment to customer service for new dentists entering Ontario.

f) Policies, procedures and/or processes, including by-laws
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

g) Resources for applicants
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

h) Review or appeal processes
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

i) Access to applicant records
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

j) Training and resources for registration staff, Council, and committee members
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

k) Mutual recognition agreements
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

l) Other (include as many items as applicable)
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

The RCDSO and our national examiner/assessor, the National Dental Examining Board of Canada (“NDEB”), continually work to improve communication with stakeholders. Stakeholders include our shared applicants, each other, Government and Fairness Commissioners.

NDEB: Communications Strategy

In 2016, we reported on the NDEB’s new communications strategy which included creating a Communications Department to meet the rising demand for information and transparency. As part of this strategy, the NDEB launched a new website and created the NDEBulletin which has over 1500 subscribers. The NDEBulletin is a tool used in conjunction with the NDEB new section of the website to broadcast NDEB information to a wide audience.

In 2017, the NDEB launched a redesign of its website based on feedback received from the website’s usability survey conducted in 2016. The NDEB has reworked the design and structure of the website to include enhanced content and improved navigation. A significant change was made to the Equivalency Process application portion by adding a new “Required Documents” section. This new section provides applicants with the list of required documents broken down by country and when possible, documents are listed in the language issued to assist applicants in providing the correct documentation.

NDEB: Pilot Project – Going Digital

The NDEB had established an ad-hoc committee to investigate options for an integrated examination to replace the Written Examination and OSCE. It identified areas where security risks exist and found that most of these risks are a result of the current paper-based testing format. By going digital, the opportunity for cheating is significantly reduced.

The NDEB’s Electronic Examination Delivery Team completed a risk analysis and developed strategies to mitigate those risks when moving to a digital platform. The NDEB investigated multiple delivery options and companies for this task.

The Virtual OSCE is currently being developed with a projected implementation in 2021 and has proposed to the Examinations Committee that all paper and pencil examinations be delivered electronically by 2022. This is a new examination that will replace the current Written Examination and OSCE. The benefit of going digital is the increasing access to the examinations.

In 2017, the NDEB Board approved a pilot electronic administration of an examination. Commencing in September 2018, the NDEB will administer a digital version of the Dental Specialty Core Knowledge Examination (“DSCKE”).

NDEB: Regulatory Oversight

Ontario and all the dental regulatory authorities in Canada continue to work with the NDEB to ensure examination and assessment processes are fair and transparent. In 2016, we reported that we attended several assessment and examination sessions as observers and sent representatives to an NDEB Standard Setting Workshop. That particular workshop centered on the Equivalency Process which consists of the assessments for the Internationally Trained. There were observers from all four provincial dental regulators that have Fairness Commissioners.

The NDEB had invited a group to provide a cross section of the dental community in this country. It included recently graduated dentists, general practice dentists with a range of years of experience, specialists, University professors and Deans, and individuals who became certified through the NDEB Equivalency Process. The workshop assists in developing practical solutions and standards that help ensure the reliability, validity and fairness of the assessment program.

In 2017, the Chair of the College’s Registration Committee attended the NDEB’s Assessment of Clinical Skills as an observer. All in all, our Chair found the process to be well-handled, standardized and fair.

Trade Agreements

As reported in 2016, at both the provincial and national level, a decision was made to prepare a submission to the provincial and federal Ministries of Trade as directed by the Canadian Dental Regulatory Authorities Federation (“CDRAF”). This purpose of the project was to assist and educate Government respecting the registration requirements of dentists in Canada in the context of international trade agreements. It spanned the role of dental regulators, how we work in a symbolic relationship with the accreditation body, the universities and national examiners. The procedures for the internationally trained were addressed and all the pathways for every candidate were described in detail. The submission spoke to the viability of Mutual Recognition Agreements (“MRA”) and in particular the challenges with having an MRA with the European Union. The submission was completed in 2016 and appears on both the CDRAF and RCDSO websites.

The Chair of the College’s Ad Hoc Committee on Labour Mobility along with the Registrar had a meeting with Stephane Dion, then Canadian Ambassador to Germany and Special Envoy to the European Union on June 21, 2017. The Ambassador asked Tanya Allem, Deputy Director, Services Trade Policy Division, Global Affairs Canada to participate. Ms Allem was integral to negotiations of labour segments and development of policy for MRA’s within CETA. Ms Allem was very interested to hear about the problems associated with the Permit – Permit concept of Labour Mobility. The Ambassador expressed a commitment to working with the College on its initiatives in the area of international trade and labour mobility going forward.

At its November 2017 meeting, Council approved the Ad Hoc Committee on Labour Mobility becoming a new permanent standing committee of the College. This Committee continues to monitor the NAFTA negotiations including provisions to expedite work visas for professionals and the possibility of permit to permit registration across the continent.

As reported in 2016, concurrent to the submission to Government noted above, a representative of the College attended the Federation of European Dental Competent Authorities and Regulators (“FEDCAR”). The conference had a single agenda item – CETA. We reported that the feedback received from delegates attending the conference confirmed that dental training across the globe varies dramatically and that there are too many inconsistencies in quality, curriculums and standards and urged that action be taken immediately. The European Union recognizes the efficacy of the Canadian approach and we shared this with the OFC in our 2016 submission.

In the meeting, points of concern were expressed by the EU and Canada. There are fears among most regulated professions, including the health sector and dentistry, that the ability to set standards respecting training, entry to practice requirements, quality assurance (pre and post-graduation), ethics, enculturation and other matters affecting public protection will be compromised by these trade agreements.

We suggested Canadian Dental Regulatory Bodies would be willing to enter into discussions respecting MRA’s with any jurisdiction if their dental programs are able to meet Canadian accreditation requirements. The conversation would need to include the EU’s approach to curricula, methods of validating outcomes, standards, processes of competency evaluation and oversight mechanisms.

The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (“CETA”) signed on October 30, 2016 entered into force on September 21, 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

Increases clarity and information provided to applicants.

 

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

Continues to validate our process as it exists.

Describe any registration-related improvements/changes to your enabling legislation and/or regulations in the last year

No changes this year

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2. Quantitative Information

a) Languages
Indicate the languages in which application information materials were available in the reporting year.
Language Yes/No
English Yes
French Yes
Other (please specify)
Additional comments:

The application form is in English but the information/instruction sheets for a General and/or Specialty Certificate of registration are in English and French.

b) Gender of applicants
Indicate the number of applicants in each category as applicable.
Gender Number of Applicants
Male 243
Female 293
None of the above 0
Additional comments:
 
c) Gender of members
Indicate the number of members in each category as applicable. Select the option that best corresponds to the terminology used by your organization.
Gender Number of Members
Male 6268
Female 3864
None of the above 0
Additional comments:

This figure represents the entire membership including those holding various restricted classes of registration.

d) Jurisdiction where applicants obtained their initial education
Indicate the number of applicants by the jurisdiction where they obtained their initial education1 in the profession or trade.
Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
133 41 64
Armenia
1
Australia
19
Bangladesh
2
Belarus
1
Brazil
5
Chile
1
China
9
Colombia
3
Croatia
1
Dominican Republic
1
Egypt
12
Greece
1
Guatemala
1
Hungary
6
India
85
Iran
32
Iraq
30
Ireland
10
Italy
1
Jordan
6
Kazakhstan
1
Korea
1
Kuwait
1
Lebanon
2
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
4
Moldova, Republic Of
1
Morocco
1
Nigeria
1
Norway
1
Pakistan
15
Philippines
5
Poland
2
Romania
1
Russia
1
S Arabia
2
Serbia
1
Sri Lanka
1
S. Africa
1
Sudan
1
Syrian Arab Republic
11
Turkey
1
United Arab Emirates
11
U.K.
5
Uzbekistan
1
Venezuela
1
Viet Nam
1
Total
301
0
539

1 Recognizing that applicants may receive their education in multiple jurisdictions, for the purpose of this question, include only the jurisdiction in which an entry-level degree, diploma or other certification required to practice the profession or trade was obtained.

Additional comments:
 
e) Jurisdiction where applicants who became registered members obtained their initial education
Indicate the number of applicants who became registered members in the reporting year by the jurisdiction where they obtained their initial education1 in the profession or trade.
Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
133 41 64
Armenia
1
Australia
19
Bangladesh
2
Belarus
1
Brazil
5
Chile
1
China
9
Colombia
3
Croatia
1
Dominican Republic
1
Egypt
12
Greece
1
Guatemala
1
Hungary
6
India
85
Iran
32
Iraq
30
Ireland
10
Italy
1
Jordan
6
Kazakhstan
1
Korea
1
Kuwait
1
Lebanon
2
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
4
Moldova, Republic Of
1
Morocco
1
Nigeria
1
Norway
1
Pakistan
15
Philippines
5
Poland
2
Romania
1
Russia
1
S Arabia
2
Serbia
1
S. Africa
1
Sri Lanka
1
Sudan
1
Syrian Arab Republic
11
Turkey
1
United Arab Emirates
11
U.K.
5
Uzbekistan
1
Venezuela
1
Viet Nam
1
Total
301
0
539

1 Recognizing that applicants may receive their education in multiple jurisdictions, for the purpose of this question, include only the jurisdiction in which an entry-level degree, diploma or other certification required to practice the profession or trade was obtained.

Additional comments:
 
f) Jurisdiction where members were initially trained
Indicate the total number of registered members by jurisdiction where they obtained their initial education1 in the profession or trade.
Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
5068 1247 1169
Afghanistan
1
Albania
6
Argentina
3
Armenia
11
Australia
73
Azerbaijan
3
Bangladesh
6
Belarus
10
Belgium
2
Bolivia
2
Brazil
36
Bulgaria
12
Chile
5
China
83
Colombia
28
Croatia
11
Cuba
5
Czech Republic
10
Denmark
2
Dominican Republic
9
Ecuador
6
Egypt
132
El Salvador
5
Estonia
1
Finland
1
France
10
Germany
6
Greece
4
Guatemala
3
Haiti
1
Hong Kong
17
Hungary
32
India
546
Indonesia
4
Iran
306
Iraq
207
Ireland
21
Israel
10
Italy
3
Japan
3
Jordan
30
Kazakhstan
3
Kenya
1
Korea
16
Kuwait
1
Kyrgyzstan
1
Latvia
2
Lebanon
7
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
8
Lithuania
4
Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic Of
56
Malta
1
Mexico
20
Moldova, Republic Of
5
Morocco
3
Nepal
3
Netherlands
1
New Zealand
4
Nicaragua
3
Nigeria
8
Norway
4
Pakistan
61
Panama
1
Peru
1
Philippines
103
Poland
97
Romania
132
Russia
27
Serbia
1
Singapore
1
Slovakia
5
Slovenia
1
S Arabia
5
S. Africa
27
Sri Lanka
43
Sudan
8
Sweden
5
Syrian Arab Republic
53
Taiwan, Province Of China
12
Tanzania, United Republic Of
1
Thailand
2
Trinidad
2
Turkey
22
Ukraine
42
United Arab Emirates
26
U.K.
67
Uzbekistan
3
Venezuela
18
Viet Nam
15
Yemen
1
Total
2599
0
10083

1 Recognizing that applicants may receive their education in multiple jurisdictions, for the purpose of this question, include only the jurisdiction in which an entry-level degree, diploma or other certification required to practice the profession or trade was obtained.

Additional comments:

This figure represents those holding full, unrestricted licensure to practice on the public.

g) Applications processed
Indicate the number of applications your organization processed in the reporting year:
Jurisdiction where applicants were initially trained in the profession (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
from January 1st to December 31st of the reporting year Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
New applications received 133 41 64 301 0
539
Applicants actively pursuing licensing (applicants who had some contact with your organization in the reporting year) 0 0 0 0 0
0
Inactive applicants (applicants who had no contact with your organization in the reporting year) 0 0 0 0 0
0
Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members 0 0 0 0 0
0
Applicants who became FULLY registered members 133 41 64 301 0
539
Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence 0 0 0 0 0
0
Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3 0 0 0 0 0
0

1 An alternative class of licence enables its holder to practice with limitations, but additional requirements must be met in order for the member to be fully licensed.

Additional comments:

All applicants must have met all registration requirements before submitting an application to us. Accordingly, barring issues that are not part of these discussions, namely, issues respecting health matters, past complaints/disciplinary history and the like, all applicants have met the competency standards and are registered. It is also typical that individuals will apply in November/December of one year requesting registration for January 1 of the following year in order to save fees. Accordingly, the numbers recorded above reflecct the number of applicants seeking full, unrestricted general or specialty certificates of registration and who were registered in 2017.

The College's Registration Regulation sets out all classes of Certificates of Registration which are listed on the pages that follow with a brief description of each class. These classes were created and agreed to by agreements with dental faculties / universities, regulators and examining bodies.

 

h) Classes of certificate/license
Inidcate and provide a description of the classes of certificate/license offered by your organization.

You must specify and describe at least one class of certificate/license (on line a) in order for this step to be complete.

# Certification Description
a) General Description (a)

Full, unrestricted registration for general practitioners practising on the public.

b) Specialty Description (b)

Dentists who have completed a post-graduate specialty program in a scope of practice recognized as a specialty, e.g. Oral Radiologst, Orthodontist, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. Those who are only registered with a specialty certificate are restricted to the scope of practice of that specialty. The majority of specialists are also registered as General Practitioners and are therefore permitted the full scope of practice of dentistry.

c) Education Description (c)

Hospital internship for students in residency based specialty programs such as oral and maxillofacial surgery. Restricted to the hospital and their training.

d) Post-Specialty Training Description (d)

As the name suggests, advanced training after completion of a specialty program - often called a "fellowship". Individual is restricted to the studies and training of their University/Hospital approved research.

e) Academic Visitor Description (e)

Essentially cultural exchanges for Academics.

Someone with a full-time professorial appointment at a University anywhere in the world can be given a one year appointment at an Ontario University.

f) Instructional Description (f)

University offer to conduct a course sponsored by a faculty or school of dentistry that is 14 days in length or less.

g) Short Duration Description (g)

University offer to attend a course sponsored by a faculty or school of dentistry that is 14 days in length or less.

h) Academic Description (h)

For full-time University faculty appointments. Restricted to their duties within the school.

i) Graduate Description (i)

Post dental degree students enrolled in specialty programs and restricted to those studies.

Additional comments:
 
i) Reviews and appeals processed
State the number of reviews and appeals your organization processed in the reporting year (use only whole numbers; do not enter commas or decimals).
Jurisdiction where applicants were initially trained in the profession (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
from January 1st to December 31st of the reporting year Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
Applications that were subject to an internal review or that were referred to a statutory committee of your governing council, such as a Registration Committee 0 2 3 0 0
5
Applicants who initiated an appeal of a registration decision 0 0 0 0 0
0
Appeals heard 0 0 0 0 0
0
Registration decisions changed following an appeal 0 0 0 0 0
0
Additional comments:

There were five reviewes conducted by the Registration Committee. All applicants were registered in 2017.

j) Paid staff
In the table below, enter the number of paid staff employed by your organization in the categories shown, on December 31 of the reporting year.

When providing information for each of the categories in this section, you may want to use decimals if you count your staff using half units. For example, one full-time employee and one part-time employee might be equivalent to 1.5 employees.

You can enter decimals to the tenths position only. For example, you can enter 1.5 or 7.5 but not 1.55 or 7.52.

Category Staff
Total staff employed by the regulatory body 106
Staff involved in appeals process 2
Staff involved in registration process 5
Additional comments:

The Registration Department processes more than just membership applications. The department reviewed approximately 1,400 new applications in 2017 respecting the two areas of registration: Membership and Health Profession Corporations. Both sections have an associated annual renewal process that involves more than just collecting fees. In addition to full-time staff, 4 - 5 temporary staff are hired throughout the year to assist with renewal processes. The staff are cross-trained and moved into the different areas as required.

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3. Submission

Submission
I hereby certify that:
Name of individual with authority to sign on behalf of the organization:
Irwin Fefergrad
Title:
Registrar
Date:
2018/02/28

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