Fair Registration Practices Report

Respiratory Therapists (2015)

The answers seen below were submitted to the OFC by the regulated professions.

This Fair Registration Practices Report was produced as required by:

  • the Fair Access to Regulated Professions and Compulsory Trades Act (FARPACTA) s. 20 and 23(1), for regulated professions named in Schedule 1 of FARPACTA
  • the Health Professions Procedural Code set out in Schedule 2 of the Regulated Health Professions Act (RHPA) s. 22.7 (1) and 22.9(1), for health colleges.

Index

  1. Qualitative Information
  2. Quantitative Information
  3. Submission

1. Qualitative Information

a) Requirements for registration, including acceptable alternatives
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

b) Assessment of qualifications
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

The CRTO’s assessment of internationally educated applicants includes a clinical skills assessment (CSA) stage. In 2015, in partnership with the Michener Institute of Education at UHN, the CRTO completed the development of the CSA, and ran the first session of the assessment on September 25/26, 2015.  The CSA evaluates the entry-to-practice competencies (knowledge, clinical skills and judgement) required to practise respiratory therapy in Ontario. These competencies are based on the National Competency Profile (NCP) developed by the National Alliance of Respiratory Therapy Regulatory Bodies.

The CSA consists of a series of simulated clinical scenarios, each designed to measure whether applicants can demonstrate specific clinical competencies at an entry-to-practice level. Applicants are also assessed on their communication skills, professionalism, clinical problem solving and health and safety practices as defined in the NCP. Applicants are observed by trained assessors who use standardized evaluation rubrics unique to each scenario to score their performance at either at standard or below the entry-to-practice standard for each individual competency. The scenarios are divided into:

  • Clinical Skills Stations - a series of 10-15 minute scenarios focused on specific skill performance.
  • Integrated Clinical Scenarios – a series of 20-25 minute stations, which require the application of knowledge, clinical skills and judgement to address a combination of competencies.

All CSA applicants are required to attend an orientation session prior to the assessment. The session includes an overall orientation to the simulated environment (e.g., equipment, mannequin), and an opportunity for hands on practice with the equipment.

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The CSA provides applicants with an opportunity to demonstrate their clinical skills in a simulated environment. The CSA is an objective assessment of clinical skills based on the entry-to-practice competencies. It has been developed with measures to ensure a fair and impartial assessment; it was psychometrically validated, and was piloted on four separate occasions using a population representative of an entry to practice level of competency.

The competencies assessed in the CSA have been taken directly from the National Competency Profile (NCP), which is the nationally validated standard that all RTs in Canada are required to meet at entry-to-practice.

Applicants who perform at or above the entry-to-practice standard are deemed to meet the non-exemptible requirement as outlined under clause 55(2)(b) of the Registration Regulation.

For applicants who perform below the entry-to-practice standard, the CSA results may be used to identify specific gaps and recommend targeted remediation. For example, applicants with a competency gap in a specific area may be required to complete a course. For individuals with significant gaps, the only option may be completion of an approved Respiratory Therapy program.

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The assessment process as a whole provides a mechanism for the Registration Committee to determine whether or not an applicant for registration has the required entry to practice competencies to provide safe, effective and ethical care. For applicants who perform below the entry-to-practice standard, the CSA results allow the Registration Committee to recommend specific remediation to address any gaps identified during the assessment. For example, an individual with a competency gap in a specific area may be required to complete a course. For individuals with significant gaps, the only option may be completion of an approved Respiratory Therapy program.

The CRTO invested many resources into the development of the CSA. The CSA was designed in partnership with experts in the assessment of healthcare professionals and in clinical simulation, and with measures to ensure a fair and impartial assessment. It was piloted on four separate occasions using a population representative of an entry to practice level of competency.

c) Provision of timely decisions, responses, and reasons
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

The CRTO’s new assessment process includes the following three components:

  1. Educational Review;
  2. Structured Interview and Feedback; and
  3. Clinical Skills Assessment.

In 2015, the CRTO completed the development of the Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA) stage. As part of this, the CRTO reviewed its assessment timelines, and mapped out how long the complete assessment may take. The expected assessment timelines are now included in the Application and Assessment Guide.

Specific timelines with regard to provision of decisions, responses and reasons are as follows:

  • 30 days after the structured interview, applicants receive an interim report which lists the assessment results up to that point.
  • 30 days after the CSA, applicants receive a gap analysis report identifying those competency areas where they scored below the minimum entry-to-practice standard.
    • Applicants have 30 days from the date of their CSA report to appeal the results
    • Applicants are notified of the outcome of their appeal within 30 days of the appeal deadline.
  • Once the assessment is complete, the entire application is then referred to a Panel of the Registration Committee for consideration. The Registration Committee Panel’s Orders and Reasons are provided to applicants four to six weeks after the Panel review date.
  • If the applicant is not satisfied with the decision he / she may appeal the Panel’s decision to the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (HPARB). Applicants have 30 days to submit their appeal to HPARB.
ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The Application and Assessment Guide provides Applicants with a detailed breakdown of the expected assessment timelines including provision of assessment reports and decisions. This information helps to ensure that applicants know what to expect at each stage of the assessment process.

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The CRTO established and publishes its reporting and decision making targets for the new assessment process to ensure that applicants know what to expect at each stage of the process. These timelines are included in the Application and Assessment Guide and are available on the CRTO website.

d) Fees
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

The following fees have been introduced in 2015 as part of the new assessment process:

  • $2,750.00 – Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA) fee. The CRTO collects the $2,750.00 CSA fee on a cost recovery basis. The fee covers the operational costs of the assessment (for example, access to simulation labs, assessors/facilitators per diems etc.); and
  • $250.00 – CSA results appeal fee – Applicants who believe that their CSA report is inaccurate may request an appeal. The $250.00 appeal fee is refundable if the appeal is resolved in the applicant’s favour.
ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

To undertake the Clinical Skills Assessment, applicants are required to pay the $2,750.00 fee. The fee must be paid in full at least four weeks before the assessment.

Applicants who believe that their CSA report is inaccurate may request an appeal. The $250.00 appeal fee is refundable if the appeal is resolved in the applicant’s favour.

The Application and Assessment Guide provides a detailed breakdown of the expected fees that may apply during the assessment process.

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The CRTO collects the $2,750.00 CSA fee on a cost recovery basis. The fee is charged to cover the operational costs of the assessment (for example, access to the simulation labs, assessors/facilitators per diems, etc.) All the development costs (including the four pilot sessions) were covered directly by the CRTO.

$250.00 appeal fee covers some of the administrative cost of the appeal. Most of the appeal costs are covered directly by the CRTO.

e) Timelines
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

The CRTO’s new assessment process includes the following three components:

  1. Educational Review;
  2. Structured Interview and Feedback; and
  3. Clinical Skills Assessment.

In 2015, the CRTO completed the development of the Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA) stage. As part of this, the CRTO reviewed its assessment timelines, and mapped out how long the complete assessment may take. The expected assessment timelines are now included in the Application and Assessment Guide.

The timing of the assessment is largely dependent on when the CSA is offered. At this time the CRTO plans to offer the CSA once or twice a year (depending on the number of applicants).

Specific timelines with regard to the new assessment process:

  • 30 days after the structured interview, applicants receive an interim report which lists the assessment results up to that point.
  • To undertake the Clinical Skills Assessment applicants are required to pay the $2,750.00 fee at least four weeks before the assessment date.
  • 30 days after the CSA, applicants receive a gap analysis report identifying those competency areas where they scored below the minimum entry-to-practice standard.
    • Applicants have 30 days from the date of their CSA report to appeal the results
    • Applicants are notified of the outcome of their appeal within 30 days of the appeal deadline.
  • Once the assessment is complete, the entire application is then referred to a Panel of the Registration Committee for consideration. The Registration Committee Panel’s Orders and Reasons are provided to applicants four to six weeks after the Panel review date.
  • If the applicant is not satisfied with the decision he / she may appeal the Panel’s decision to the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board (HPARB). Applicants have 30 days to submit their appeal to HPARB.
ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The Application and Assessment Guide provides Applicants with a detailed breakdown of the expected assessment timelines. This information helps to ensure that applicants know what to expect at each stage of the assessment process.

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The CRTO established and publishes the expected assessment timelines to ensure that applicants know what to expect at each stage of the process. These timelines are included in the Application and Assessment Guide and are available on the CRTO website.

f) Policies, procedures and/or processes, including by-laws
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

Over the last few years, the CRTO has been focusing on a number of issues related to transparency. This aligned with the 2014 direction received from the Minister of Health to make transparency a day-to-day priority and to embed it in the CRTO’s strategic plan. As a result, the CRTO developed a Transparency Improvement Plan and as part of the plan undertook a review of its By-Laws and policies specifically with regard to the content of the Register, and information Members are required to report to the CRTO.

In December 2015, CRTO Council approved a number of By-Law and policy changes which came into effect on January 1, 2016, and include the following:

  • By-Law change – Article 31
  • Determining Good Character Policy
  • Proceedings Outside the CRTO Policy

The CRTO requires applicants to provide their personal, educational, contact, employment and conduct information. As a result of the above mentioned policy changes, effective January 1, 2016, CRTO applicants are now required to report the following additional information:

  • Charges or findings related to any of the following:
    • criminal offences in Canada or in any jurisdiction outside Canada
    • offences under the Health Insurance Act
    • offences related to prescribing, compounding, dispensing, selling or administering drugs
    • offences that occurred while practising, or that was related to the practice of, health care
    • offences in which they were impaired or intoxicated
    • other offences relevant to their suitability to practise the profession
  • Information related to bail conditions
ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The CRTO requires applicants to provide their personal, educational, contact, employment and conduct information. Effective January 1, 2016, Applicants are required to report the following additional information:

  • Charges or findings related to any of the following:
    • criminal offences in Canada or in any jurisdiction outside Canada
    • offences under the Health Insurance Act
    • offences related to prescribing, compounding, dispensing, selling or administering drugs
    • offences that occurred while practising, or that was related to the practice of, health care
    • offences in which they were impaired or intoxicated
    • other offences relevant to their suitability to practise the profession
  • Information related to bail conditions
iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The CRTO requires applicants to provide their personal, educational, contact, employment and conduct information. Effective January 1, 2016, the CRTO started to collect the following additional information:

  • Charges or findings related to any of the following:
    • criminal offences in Canada or in any jurisdiction outside Canada
    • offences under the Health Insurance Act
    • offences related to prescribing, compounding, dispensing, selling or administering drugs
    • offences that occurred while practising, or that was related to the practice of, health care
    • offences in which they were impaired or intoxicated
    • other offences relevant to their suitability to practise the profession
  • Information related to bail conditions

To facilitate the collection of new information, the CRTO revised its database as well as the application for registration form, application guide, change of information form and the registration renewal form. After registration, some of the information collected may be considered "public" and will be included in the Register on the CRTO website.

g) Resources for applicants
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

In 2015, the CRTO completed the development of the Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA) stage. As part of this, the CRTO reviewed the Application and Assessment Guide. Following the review the guide was updated with the following information:

  • Self-Assessment Readiness ToolTM (see below)
  • Clinical Skills Assessment
  • Expected Assessment Timelines and Fees
  • Revised privacy statement (as a result of the CRTO’s transparency initiative)
  • Resources – addition of a link to the Immigrant Access Fund (IAF)

In addition the following resources have been developed/implemented in 2015:

  • Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA) Guide - the Guide includes:
    • an overview of the CSA,
    • detailed explanation of what to expect on the day of the assessment
    • samples of clinical scenarios
    • list of equipment that may be used in the CSA
    • links to a number of key resources candidates can use to prepare for the assessment, including the National Competency Profile for entry to practice and the CRTO’s Clinical Best Practice Guideline for Infection Control.
  • CSA orientation session – all applicants undertaking the CSA are required to attend an in person orientation session. The aim of the orientation session is to provide an overview of the CSA. The orientation offers applicants an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the simulated environment, the mannequins and the equipment they will be using during the CSA.
  • CSA facilitators – during each CSA scenario applicants have access to a trained facilitator. If needed, and where appropriate, the facilitator is there to provide relevant information (e.g., where to find a particular piece of equipment, or how to make a certain parameter change on a ventilator), assisting the applicant in demonstrating the competency even if not familiar with a particular device or setting.
  • Self-Assessment Readiness Tool– The CRTO provides a link to an online self-assessment tool. The tool was developed by Atlantic Connection (in partnership with NARTRB) with funding from Health Canada.  The SART is designed to help internationally educated healthcare professionals understand the respiratory therapy profession in Canada. It describes what respiratory therapists in Canada are expected to know and do. There is no direct link between completion of the SART and the CRTO’s assessment process; however, the tool helps applicants assess their skills based on respiratory therapist competency guidelines and to identify possible pathways. The SART is offered at no charge.
ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The Application and Assessment Guide provides Applicants with a detailed overview of the application and assessment process. The guide helps to ensure that applicants know what to expect at each stage of the assessment process.

The CSA Guide provides a detailed overview of the clinical assessment stage and includes a number of resources available to applicants. The CSA orientation session offers applicants an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the simulated environment, the mannequins and the equipment they will be using during the CSA (this includes hands-on practice with the equipment).

The Self-Assessment Readiness Tool was designed to help internationally educated healthcare professionals understand the respiratory therapy profession in Canada. SART allows applicants to assess their skills based on the entry-to-practice respiratory therapy competencies, and to identify possible pathways for registration. The SART is offered at no charge.

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The CRTO aims to provide applicants with comprehensive and easily available information. The Application and Assessment Guide provides a detailed overview of the application and assessment process. It helps to ensure that applicants know what to expect at each stage of the assessment process. The guide is available on the CRTO website.

To help applicants to prepare for the clinical skills assessment, the CRTO developed the CSA Guide which provides a detailed overview of this stage of the assessment. The CRTO also requires that applicants undertaking the CSA attend the in-person orientation session. The orientation provides an opportunity for applicants to familiarize themselves with the simulated environment, the mannequins and the equipment they will be using during the CSA.

h) Review or appeal processes
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

The CRTO’s new assessment process includes a Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA) stage. After the CSA, applicants receive a report indicating whether they performed at or below the entry-to-practice standard for each competency area assessed. Applicants who believe that their CSA report is inaccurate may request an appeal. The request for an appeal must be submitted in writing along with a $250.00 fee.

In an appeal, the Registrar assembles an Appeal Panel to consider all the information related to the applicant’s performance, including a video recording from the date of the assessment and any additional information provided by the applicant. The panels are composed of at least two independent, trained subject matter experts / reviewers who were not part of the clinical skills assessment. If the panel finds that the applicant’s performance in a particular competency area was at standard, then the panel may order that the assessment result be changed in that competency area. If so the CRTO will refund the $250.00 appeal fee.

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The CSA appeal process provides an opportunity for applicants who disagree with their CSA reports to have their concerns considered by an independent panel.

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The CSA appeal process provides an opportunity for applicants who disagree with their CSA reports to have their concerns considered by an independent panel. This requires the CRTO to assemble a panel of independent, trained subject matter experts / reviewers who were not part of the clinical skills assessment.

i) Access to applicant records
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

j) Training and resources for registration staff, Council, and committee members
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

In June 2015, CRTO staff, Registration Committee members, and others involved in the assessment process (e.g., interviewers, CSA assessors) had undergone a customized training program, which included formal education provided by an external agency on cultural diversity specifically as it pertains to internationally trained healthcare practitioners.

The CSA was piloted on four separate occasions before the September 26 assessment. These pilot sessions provided an opportunity for the assessors to familiarise themselves with the clinical scenarios and scoring tools.

Members of the Registration Committee conducted a number of simulated file review exercises to familiarize themselves with the assessment process and reporting tools.   

At the December 2015 meeting, Council members and staff completed the OFC’s “Understanding Fair Access Law” online learning module. 

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

The CSA was designed with measures to ensure that applicants have access to a fair and impartial assessment. In advance of the CSA, CRTO staff, Registration Committee members, and others involved in the assessment process had undergone a customized training program, which included formal education provided by an external agency on cultural diversity specifically as it pertains to internationally trained healthcare practitioners. In addition, the assessor training focused on issues related to rating accuracy and scoring process.  

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

The CRTO takes measures to ensure that those involved in the assessment process have the skills and knowledge necessary for unbiased and objective decision making.  This includes providing targeted training, facilitating simulated exercises and piloting the tools used in the assessment process.

k) Mutual recognition agreements
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

l) Other (include as many items as applicable)
i. Describe any improvements / changes implemented in the last year.

No changes this year

ii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on applicants.

No changes this year

iii. Describe the impact of the improvements / changes on your organization.

No changes this year

Describe any registration-related improvements/changes to your enabling legislation and/or regulations in the last year

No changes this year

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2. Quantitative Information

a) Languages
Indicate the languages in which application information materials were available in the reporting year.
Language Yes/No
English Yes
French Yes
Other (please specify)
Additional comments:
 
b) Gender of applicants
Indicate the number of applicants in each category as applicable.
Gender Number of Applicants
Male 63
Female 152
None of the above 0
Additional comments:
 
c) Gender of members
Indicate the number of members in each category as applicable. Select the option that best corresponds to the terminology used by your organization.
Gender Number of Members
Male 887
Female 2265
None of the above 0
Additional comments:
 
d) Jurisdiction where applicants obtained their initial education
Indicate the number of applicants by the jurisdiction where they obtained their initial education1 in the profession or trade.
Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
207 4 1
Colombia
1
India
1
Philippines
1
Total
3
0
215

1 Recognizing that applicants may receive their education in multiple jurisdictions, for the purpose of this question, include only the jurisdiction in which an entry-level degree, diploma or other certification required to practice the profession or trade was obtained.

Additional comments:
 
e) Jurisdiction where applicants who became registered members obtained their initial education
Indicate the number of applicants who became registered members in the reporting year by the jurisdiction where they obtained their initial education1 in the profession or trade.
Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
185 2 0
n/a
0
Total
0
0
187

1 Recognizing that applicants may receive their education in multiple jurisdictions, for the purpose of this question, include only the jurisdiction in which an entry-level degree, diploma or other certification required to practice the profession or trade was obtained.

Additional comments:
 
f) Jurisdiction where members were initially trained
Indicate the total number of registered members by jurisdiction where they obtained their initial education1 in the profession or trade.
Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
2898 181 67
China
1
India
2
Philippines
1
Venezuela
1
Iran
1
Total
6
0
3152

1 Recognizing that applicants may receive their education in multiple jurisdictions, for the purpose of this question, include only the jurisdiction in which an entry-level degree, diploma or other certification required to practice the profession or trade was obtained.

Additional comments:
 
g) Applications processed
Indicate the number of applications your organization processed in the reporting year:
Jurisdiction where applicants were initially trained in the profession (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
from January 1st to December 31st of the reporting year Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
New applications received 207 4 1 3 0
215
Applicants actively pursuing licensing (applicants who had some contact with your organization in the reporting year) 22 2 1 3 0
28
Inactive applicants (applicants who had no contact with your organization in the reporting year) 0 0 0 0 0
0
Applicants who met all requirements and were authorized to become members but did not become members 0 0 0 0 0
0
Applicants who became FULLY registered members 163 2 0 0 0
165
Applicants who were authorized to receive an alternative class of licence3 but were not issued a licence 9 0 0 0 0
9
Applicants who were issued an alternative class of licence3 22 0 0 0 0
22

1 An alternative class of licence enables its holder to practice with limitations, but additional requirements must be met in order for the member to be fully licensed.

Additional comments:
 
h) Classes of certificate/license
Inidcate and provide a description of the classes of certificate/license offered by your organization.

You must specify and describe at least one class of certificate/license (on line a) in order for this step to be complete.

# Certification Description
a) General Description (a)

A General Certificate of Registration is issued to an individual who has met all academic requirements and has successfully completed the registration examination or evaluation approved by the College. If a Member holds a General Certificate of Registration, he/she must use the designation RRT and may use “Registered Respiratory Therapist” or “Respiratory Therapist” as his/her professional title.

b) Graduate Description (b)

A Graduate Certificate of Registration is issued to an individual who has met all academic requirements but has not yet successfully completed the registration examination or evaluation approved by the College. If a Member holds a Graduate Certificate of Registration, he / she must use the designation GRT and may use “Graduate Respiratory Therapist” as his/her professional title. The following conditions apply to a Graduate Certificate of Registration:

The (Graduate) member shall,

1.         at the first reasonable opportunity, advise every employer of any terms, conditions and limitations that apply to the member’s graduate certificate of registration if their employment is in the field of Respiratory Therapy;

2.         only perform a controlled act that is authorized to the profession if it is performed under the general supervision of a member of a College within the meaning of the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 who, the member holding the graduate certificate has reasonable grounds to believe, is authorized to perform the controlled act and is competent to do so and who is available to be personally present at the site where the authorized act is performed on ten minutes notice;

3.         not delegate a controlled act; and

4.         not perform advanced prescribed procedures below the dermis;

5.         not perform authorized act #5 “administering a prescribed substance by inhalation”; and

6.         not perform a tracheostomy tube change for a stoma that is less than 24 hours old.

This is a temporary class of registration and is automatically revoked after 18 months.

c) Limited Description (c)

Limited Certificates of Registration were issued to individuals who had not met all requirements for a General Certificate of Registration but provided sufficient evidence to a Panel of the Registration Committee of their competence to practice in a defined area of the scope of practice of the profession. (CRTO stopped issuing Limited Certificates of Registration on February 25, 1999). If a Member holds a Limited Certificate of Registration, he / she must use the designation PRT and may use “Practical Respiratory Therapist” as his/her professional title.

d) Inactive Description (d)

A Member registered with a General or Limited Certificate of Registration may apply for an Inactive Certificate of Registration provided he/she is not practising the profession in the broadest sense of that phrase.

The following conditions apply to an Inactive Certificate of Registration:

The (Inactive) member shall not,

(a)        engage in providing direct patient care;

(b)        use his or her professional title or designation;

(c)        supervise the practice of the profession; or

(d)        make any claim or representation to having any competence in the profession.

Additional comments:
 
i) Reviews and appeals processed
State the number of reviews and appeals your organization processed in the reporting year (use only whole numbers; do not enter commas or decimals).
Jurisdiction where applicants were initially trained in the profession (before they were granted use of the protected title or professional designation in Ontario)
from January 1st to December 31st of the reporting year Ontario Other Canadian Provinces USA Other International Unknown Total
Applications that were subject to an internal review or that were referred to a statutory committee of your governing council, such as a Registration Committee 6 1 0 0 0
7
Applicants who initiated an appeal of a registration decision 0 0 0 0 0
0
Appeals heard 0 0 0 0 0
0
Registration decisions changed following an appeal 0 0 0 0 0
0
Additional comments:

0

j) Paid staff
In the table below, enter the number of paid staff employed by your organization in the categories shown, on December 31 of the reporting year.

When providing information for each of the categories in this section, you may want to use decimals if you count your staff using half units. For example, one full-time employee and one part-time employee might be equivalent to 1.5 employees.

You can enter decimals to the tenths position only. For example, you can enter 1.5 or 7.5 but not 1.55 or 7.52.

Category Staff
Total staff employed by the regulatory body 8
Staff involved in appeals process 2
Staff involved in registration process 3
Additional comments:
 

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3. Submission

Submission
I hereby certify that:
Name of individual with authority to sign on behalf of the organization:
Kevin Taylor
Title:
Registrar
Date:
2016/02/29

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